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India’s Republic Day commemorated in Tehran
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Indian Ambassador Shri D.P. Srivastava reads out the message of Indian President Pranab Mukherjee during a function at the Indian Embassy in Tehran on Saturday, January 26, 2013, which was held to commemorate India’s Republic Day.
Indian Ambassador Shri D.P. Srivastava reads out the message of Indian President Pranab Mukherjee during a function at the Indian Embassy in Tehran on Saturday, January 26, 2013, which was held to commemorate India’s Republic Day.
TEHRAN – A function was held at the Indian Embassy in Tehran on Saturday to commemorate the Republic Day of India.

 
On January 26, 1950, the Constitution of India, which was adopted on November 26, 1949, came into force, replacing the Government of India Act 1935 as the governing document of the country. 
 
The occasion was celebrated by Indians across the world, including in New Delhi, where large areas were sealed off for a military parade, during which a number of pieces of military hardware were put on display.
 
Bhutan’s King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck was the guest of honor at the celebrations in New Delhi, which began with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh laying a wreath and observing two minutes of silence in honor of the fallen heroes at the India Gate war memorial in the heart of the capital.  
 
During the celebrations, Indian President Pranab Mukherjee unfurled the Tricolor at Rajpath, and presidential bodyguards presented the National Salute.
 
The ceremonies culminated at around noon local time when the national anthem was played and tricolored balloons were released. 
 
The event in Tehran began with a flag ceremony, during which India’s national anthem was sung. 
 
Afterwards, the Indian president’s message to the nation, which was issued on the eve of the celebrations, was read out by Indian Ambassador Shri D.P. Srivastava, and a number of children performed patriotic songs. 
 
India has achieved much to be proud of
 
In his message, the Indian president praised the country’s achievements in various areas, saying, “In the last six decades, there is much that we can be proud of. Our economic growth rate has more than tripled. The literacy rate has increased by over four times. After having attained self-sufficiency, now we are net exporters of food grain. Significant reduction in the incidence of poverty has been achieved. Among our other major achievements is the drive towards gender equality.” 
 
“The time has now come to ensure gender equality for every Indian woman. We can neither evade nor abandon this national commitment, for the price of neglect will be high. Vested interests do not surrender easily. The civil society and the government must work together to fulfill this national goal,” Mukherjee stated in his first annual address on the occasion of India’s Republic Day. 
 
It is time for the nation to reset its moral compass 
 
Referring to the gang rape and murder of a female Indian student last month, the Indian president said, “It is time for the nation to reset its moral compass. Nothing should be allowed to spur cynicism, as cynicism is blind to morality. We must look deep into our conscience and find out where we have faltered. The solutions to problems have to be found through discussion and conciliation of views. People must believe that governance is an instrument for good and for that, we must ensure good governance.” 
 
Primary purpose of wealth creation must be to drive out the evil of hunger
 
Mukherjee also noted that India “must ensure that the fruits of economic growth do not become the monopoly of the privileged at the peak of a pyramid,” adding, “The primary purpose of wealth creation must be to drive out the evil of hunger, deprivation, and marginal subsistence from the base of our expanding population.” 
 
In addition, he advised Indians to avoid being trapped by a culture of entitlement without social obligations, saying, “As we move ahead on the path of economic reforms, we must remain alive to the persisting problems of market-dependent economies. Many rich nations are now trapped by a culture of entitlement without social obligations; we must avoid this trap. The results of our policies should be seen in our villages, farms and factories, schools and hospitals.” 
 
India’s hand of friendship should not be taken for granted 
 
Elsewhere in his message, Mukherjee commented on the border tension between India and Pakistan, saying, “In the recent past, we have seen serious atrocities on the Line of Control on our troops. Neighbors may have disagreements; tension can be a subtext of frontiers. But sponsorship of terrorism through non-state actors is a matter of deep concern to the entire nation. We believe in peace on the border and are always ready to offer a hand in the hope of friendship. But this hand should not be taken for granted.” 
 
EP/HG

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Last Updated on 28 January 2013 14:25